More PLS News & Info

RECENT NEWS AND INFO


PLS Speaks Out on New Solitary Confinement Policy for NY Jails

CBS, News Channel 6 interviewed Karen Murtagh on Governor Cuomo's plan 

to reduce solitary confinement in the local jails

See Link below for the entire interview

http://cbs6albany.com/news/local/new-york-state-pushing-forward-with-plan-to-reduce-solitary-confinement-in-local-jails





**PRESS RELEASE**

Nadia Alirahi is third year student at Albany Law School where she is the projector director for the Albany Chapter of the International Refugee Assistance Project, the Immigration Assistance Project, the President of the Muslim Law Student Association, and a current 3L Senator on the Student Bar Association. During her second year, Nadia participated in the Immigration Law Clinic where she practiced as a student attorney and prepared U-Visas and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status applications. Nadia previously interned at the Albany County District Attorney’s Office where she had the opportunity to second seat trials, conduct hearings, attend night court, draft motions and memos. Her first year summer, she interned at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, when she conducted a hearing, drafted memos, and researched various legal issues as assigned. Prior to law school, Nadia graduated from SUNY New Paltz where she majored in International Relations and minored in Environmental studies. Nadia graduated from Pleasantville High School in Westchester, New York, where her parents immigrated to from Pakistan.

                                                                 




                                               







A Look Back Two Years After the Dannemora Prison Escape

Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York’s Executive Director, Karen Murtagh speaks on changes 
made at Dannemora prison after the escape.

http://wamc.org/post/look-back-two-years-after-dannemora-prison-escape










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     NYBF SPONSORS IMMIGRATION FELLOWS AT PLS  






                                                                       














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​​NYS ASSEMBLY CORRECTION CHAIR DAVID WEPRIN HOLDS PRESS CONFERENCE OPPOSING PROPOSED VISITATION CUTS AT MAXIMUM SECURITY PRISONS


Assemblyman David Weprin and Major Advocacy Coalition Stand Together to Oppose Proposed Visitation Cuts at Maximum Security Prisons. To read complete press release click here

Assemblyman David Weprin, Chair of the Assembly Committee on Correction, joined his colleagues on the Correction Committee, as well as other elected officials and prison reform advocates to stand in opposition to the proposed reduction of visitation days at New York State’s maximum-security prisons. The plan, part of the 2017/2018 Executive Budget Proposal for New York State, would reduce visitation at New York’s maximum security prisons from seven days a week, as is now, to three days per week. The reduction in visitation would also allow the state to save $2.6 million by eliminating 39 Full Time Corrections Positions.

 In a bipartisan effort to have this cut removed from the final enacted state budget, Weprin and members of the Assembly Committee on Correction have authored a letter to Governor Andrew Cuomo listing the benefits of prison visitation. The letter has been signed by each member of the Committee, from both sides of the aisle. Weprin also noted that the cut would be removed in the Assembly one-house budget resolution.

 Speaking in the Capitol, Weprin noted the already high demand for visits as a reason to oppose the cuts, as well as past research which has shown that visiting helps to decrease recidivism and reduce violence at corrections facilities. He also voiced concern that the reduction would unfairly penalize the families of the incarcerated by limiting the days when families would be allowed to visit.

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PLS SAVED OVER 61 YEARS OF SOLITARY CONFINEMENT TIME, 19 YEARS OF GOOD TIME  AND OVER 17 YEARS OF JAIL AND SENTENCING TIME FOR CLIENTS IN 2016 - Benefiting our clients, enhancing public safety and saving the state money.

PLS ensures that people's sentences are calculated accurately and that they receive all of the good time, sentencing credit and jail time to which they are entitled. PLS’ also represents incarcerated individuals on prison disciplinary hearings that can result in the imposition of solitary confinement. In 2016, PLS handled hundreds of cases where people were wrongfully placed in solitary confinement or had errors in their jail and sentencing computations. By doing so, PLS saved over 61 years of solitary confinement time, 19 years of good time and over 17 years of jail and sentencing time for our clients.


PLS' work in the area of solitary confinement not only benefits our clients, but helps enhance public safety and save the state money. A Washington State study found that people who were released directly from segregation had a much higher rate of recidivism than individuals who spent time in the normal prison setting before returning to the community: 64 percent compared with 41 percent. When people are released from solitary confinement they are able to participate in educational and other rehabilitative programs. Participation in such programs increases the likelihood of early release and, as demonstrated by the Washington State study, dramatically reduces the recidivism rate. In addition, if a person is in general population as opposed to solitary confinement when he/she appears before the parole board, release is much more likely. Finally, it costs over $60,000 a year to house a person in prison. By correcting jail time, good time and sentencing errors, and increasing the likelihood of release, PLS saves the state millions of dollars annually.  


PLS WINS DISCIPLINARY CASE - COURT ORDERS EXPUNGEMENT OF THE CHARGES 

Our client was charged with assault and given 270 days in solitary confinement. PLS filed a lawsuit asking the court to expunge the charges due to constitutional and procedural errors at the hearing.  On February 9, 2017, the Appellate Division, Third Department issued a decision holding that our client was prejudiced at his prison disciplinary hearing because his employee assistant failed to interview requested witnesses and because the Hearing Officer denied our client's request for a witness based on the hearing officer's own speculation regarding the probable content of  the witness’s testimony. The court ordered a reversal of the hearing disposition and expungement of the charges. Matter of Nance v. Annucci, #523293 (3d Dep’t Feb. 9, 2017)


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TESTIFIES AT 2017 SENATE & ASSEMBLY JOINT BUDGET HEARING ON PUBLIC PROTECTION

On January 31, 2017, PLS Board Member, Tom Curran and PLS Executive Director, Karen Murtagh, testified at the NYS Senate and Assembly Joint Budget Hearing on Public Protection. To read the testimony, click here. To watch the hearing testimony click on this link:  http://nystateassembly.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=8&clip_id=4060 and go to the 10:43 mark.  

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PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CHOSEN TO RECEIVE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION IN THE FIELD OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES 

The New York State Bar Association Criminal Justice Section has chosen PLS Executive Director, Karen Murtagh, as the award recipient for the Section's Award for Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Correctional Services.  The award will be presented to Ms. Murtagh in May 2017 at the Criminal Justice Section's annual spring meeting in Seneca Falls, NY.  


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CO-CHAIRS CLE PANEL ON PRISON LITIGATION

On November 16, 2016, PLS Executive Director, Karen Murtagh and Jack Beck from the Correctional Association, co-chaired a full-day CLE on Prison Litigation. Panelists included Steven Wu, Assistant Attorney General, Dori Lewis, Legal Aid’s Prisoners’ Rights Project, Professors Phillip Genty from Columbia Law School and Brad Wendell from Cornell Law School and S.D.N.Y. Judge Sarah Netburn. Over 800 individuals participated between in-person attendees and those who watched via webcast.


PLS AWARDED 2017 NYBF GRANT FOR IMMIGRATION FELLOWS​​

PLS was recently awarded a grant from the New York Bar Foundation that will enable PLS to hire two law students as Immigration Fellows for the summer of 2017 or the 2017 fall semester. The fellows will gain experience analyzing the immigration consequences of criminal convictions and representing immigrants in removal proceedings. Thank you to the New York Bar Foundation for supporting this project!



STATE ORDERED TO PROVIDE DISABLED PRISONER WITH MOTORIZED WHEELCHAIR

​This case raised the issue of whether DOCCS' refusal to allow a disabled prisoner the use of a motorized wheelchair was discriminatory under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act.  The district court initially granted summary judgment in favor of DOCCS’ universal ban on motorized wheelchairs in prison. On appeal to the Second Circuit, Disability Rights New York, PLS and numerous other legal services advocates filed an amicus brief arguing that such a ban violated the protections of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act.

The Second Circuit held that the Department of Corrections’ blanket ban on motorized wheelchairs violated both the ADA and the RA and that there was a dispute of material fact as to whether DOCCS provided the plaintiff meaningful access to DOCCS’ services or would be unduly burdened by allowing the plaintiff the use of his motorized wheelchair. The court vacated the judgment and remanded the case for further proceedings. Wright v. DOCCS, 831 F.3d 74 (2d Circuit 2016).

On March 10, 2017, Northern District Judge Mae D'Agostino issued a decision on the case after taking evidence at trial. She found that DOCCS failed to show that there were such safety risks in giving Nathaniel Wright the electric wheelchair that they outweighed his right to have the device. "The court holds that the preponderance of credible evidence at trial established that plaintiff was denied meaningful access to benefits and services and the use of his motorized wheelchair in the DOCCS facilities would not unduly burden DOCCS," she wrote.


PLS AWARDED TWO-YEAR GRANT TO FOCUS ON YOUTH UNDER 21

AND VETERANS

PLS was recently awarded a 2-year grant from the Van Ameringen Foundation to open a Mental Health Project (MHP) specifically focusing on the needs of youth under 21 and veterans who suffer from mental illness because they are two of the largest segments of the prison population who are among the most vulnerable. Youth under 21 and veterans experience higher rates of mental illness than are experienced by other groups of prisoners. Through PLS’ MHP, eligible clients will be able to obtain the mental health care they need and PLS will works to ensure that they are not subjected to conditions, such as long-term solitary confinement, that will exacerbate their mental illness.


PLS HIRES FIRST IMMIGRATION FELLOW 

Deokhee Ryu is a first-year student at Penn State Law School. She will be joining Prisoners’ Legal Services (PLS) Immigration Initiative in Albany as a New York Bar Foundation Immigration Fellow for the summer of 2016.  The PLS Immigration Initiative provides free representation to non-citizens who are incarcerated in New York State prisons and facing removal before the Ulster Immigration Court.  Prior to law school, Deokhee majored in Hindi and French at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in South Korea. Her experiences in the field of immigration and public interest include internships with United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and Seoul International Friendship Organization (SIFO). During her internship at UNHCR, she provided counseling service on Refugee Status Determination Process for asylum-seekers and refugees. At SIFO, she managed international cooperation projects in Philippines.

PLS WINS TWO IMMIGRATION MERITS HEARING

PLS recently won two merits hearings for non-citizen clients facing removal from the United States. In the first case, the judge granted Cancellation of Removal for a Lawful Permanent Resident from Jamaica whose family lives in Queens, New York.  Our client is the father of two young U.S. Citizen children, for whom he will now be able to provide care when he is released from prison later this year. In the second case, PLS represented a refugee from Burma who belongs to a persecuted ethnic minority, and was granted relief from deportation under the Convention Against Torture.  In both cases the clients were represented by Rosa Cohen Cruz, PLS' Senior Immigration Attorney.


ITHACA OFFICE HIRES NEW SECRETARY 

​Elizabeth Banks joined Prisoner’s Legal Services on February 22, 2016 as a legal secretary. She comes to PLS from Heritage Park Apartments, in Elmira, NY, where she was the Assistant Youth Project Director for The Heritage Park Apartments Resource Center.  Prior to that position, she worked from 1991 to 2008, as a Legal Secretary for a New York City law firm specializing in construction law.


PLS PARTNERS WITH THE GOVERNOR’S OFFICE TO PROVIDE TRAINING ON CLEMENCY APPLICATIONS

PLS recently entered into a partnership with the Governor's office to provide training to law students and pro bono attorneys on how to compile and file clemency applications.  For information about the upcoming training click here. 


PLS PARTNERS WITH DOCCS TO PROVIDE TRAINING ON EARLY PAROLE FOR CONDITIONAL DEPORTATION ONLY

PLS recently began working with New York State's Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS) to develop and present continuing legal education training  on the process for seeking Early Conditional Parole for Deportation Only (ECPDO) and Conditional Parole for Deportation Only (CPDO).  For information about the upcoming training click here


​THE NEW YORK STATE BAR ASSOCIATION WRITES MEMO OF SUPPORT FOR PLS

PLS is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1976 and is funded primarily by New York State. Every year PLS requests that the State continue funding PLS and, this year, in support of that request, the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) submitted a memorandum in support of PLS to Legislative leaders. To read the memo, click here.


PLS SAVES OVER 82 YEARS OF SOLITARY CONFINEMENT TIME IN 2015
PLS helps ensures that prisoners are not held in solitary confinement in violation of the law. We do this by challenging unlawful or illegal disciplinary hearings. In 2015, PLS’ work in this area resulted in a reduction of over 82 years of solitary confinement time for hundreds of prisoners.


PLS SAVES OVER 63 YEARS OF JAIL TIME, GOOD TIME AND SENTENCING TIME  
PLS also ensures that sentences are calculated accurately and that prisoners receive all of the good time, sentencing credit and jail time to which they are entitled. In 2015, PLS’ work in this area resulted in over 63 years of jail time, good time and sentencing time being credited to prisoners’ sentences.

For every year of good time restored and jail time and sentence computations corrected, PLS saves the State at least $60,076.00, see
: http://www.vera.org/files/price-of-prisons-new-york-fact-sheet.pdf. 


PLS HIRES NEW IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY

We would like to welcome our newest addition to the PLS staff, Kelly Anderson, immigration staff attorney who was recently hired under PLS’ Vera NYIFUP Immigration Grant. Ms. Anderson was recently admitted to the New York State Bar. Please join us in congratulating Ms. Anderson on her admission and welcoming her to PLS!  


PLS TAKES ON 40 IMMIGRATION CASES & WINS BOND HEARING  

Over the past several months, PLS’ Immigration Initiative, funded through a grant administered by the Vera Institute of Justice and funded by the New York Immigration Family Unity Project (NYIFUP) has accepted 40 cases. Our Senior Immigration Attorney, Rosa Cohen Cruz was recently won a bond hearing in New York City on an immigration case.  The client’s family was able to raise the $10,000 bond set by the Judge and the client is now home with his family.


EXECUTIVE ORDER #150
PLS congratulates Governor Cuomo for signing Executive Order #150, which establishes correctional facilities within DOCCS exclusively for youth, requires that DOCCS consult with the Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) regarding the treatment of youth, and mandates specialized training of DOCCS staff. In light of this Executive Order, PLS attorney, Maria Pagano negotiated an extension of the Cookhorne settlement (reported below) so that PLS will now be monitoring not only Coxsackie, Woodbourne and Green Correctional Facilities, but also the new youth facility at Hudson Correctional Facility scheduled to begin accepting youth this August. PLS’ monitoring has also been extended by three years.  


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TESTIFIES AT JOINT LEGISLATIVE HEARING
PLS Executive Director, Karen Murtagh, testified before the Joint Legislative Hearings on Public Protection. Watch the testimony here:  or read the testimonyhere: 


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SPEAKS OUT ON THE NEED FOR PRISON OVERSIGHT

PLS Executive Director Karen Murtagh testified before the Assembly Hearing on Prison Oversight. Read More


​PLS BUFFALO AND PLATTSBURGH OFFICES MOVED INTO NEW SPACE

Please note their new address: 

                                     PLS - Plattsburgh                                                                                PLS - Buffalo

              24 Margaret St., Suite 9, Plattsburgh, NY 12901                  14 Lafayette Square, Suite 510, Buffalo, NY 14203


PLS PREVAILS IN MEDICAL PAROLE CASE!
In December, PLS, obtained the release of prisoner on medical parole so he was able to spend Christmas with his family. Thanks to the relentless efforts of PLS attorneys Samantha Howell and Lisa Weinstein our client was able to die at home with his loving family surrounding him. 


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR VOICES CONCERN OVER CLINTON LOCKDOWN

Read more


PLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SPEAKS OUT ON CLINTON ESCAPE
Read more


VIDEO ABOUT INCARCEATED NEW YORKERS 
Sam Ferrone, a 14-year old, made a video about incarcerated New Yorkers for a school project. He interviewed advocates and currently incarcerated individuals. This video highlights the humanity of incarcerated individuals. Thank you, Sam, for making this video. We, too, hope it will raise awareness about the injustice of the prison system​.​


NYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS URGES REFORMS TO SOLITARY CONFINEMENT IN NEW YORK STATE 

In December 2014, the NY State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, issued a scathing indictment of New York’s use of solitary confinement (known as special housing units or SHUs). Noting that isolation has a “devastating effect on youth,” the committee urged the U.S. Department of Justice to use its power to force NYS to immediately stop the placement of persons 25 years old or younger in the special housing units and to develop alternatives to solitary confinement.

You can find the full report here; the recommendations begin on page 59.


PRISONERS’ LEGAL SERVICES REACHES LANDMARK SETTLEMENT FOR JUVENILES
Read More

IACHR Conducted a Visit to New York, United States
The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) conducted a visit to New York, United States, from April 7 to 10, 2014. The visit aimed to gather information on the situation of persons under the age of 18 charged, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated as and with adults, and the detention conditions of youth in jails and prisons.  New York is one of the two states in the United States that automatically excludes adolescents from the juvenile system at age 16, and tries them as adults. The delegation was led by the IACHR Rapporteur on the Rights of the Child, Commissioner Rosa Maria Ortiz, accompanied by staff attorneys of the Executive Secretary of the IACHR from the Office of the Rapporteurs on the Rights of the Child and Adolescents and on the Rights of Persons Deprived of Liberty.

To read more of about the Rapporteur’s visi
t click here






NYBF SPONSORS IMMIGRATION FELLOWS AT PLS


Corrections Chair David Weprin, Assemblymember Carmen De La Rosa
Call for 7-Day Visitation at NY Medium Security Prisons
and Restoration of Free Transportation for Visiting


Claudia Cadenillas is a second year student at Albany Law School where she is the vice-president of the Latino Law Student Association, an Executive Board member for the Albany Law Pro Bono Project, an associate member of the Moot Court Board, a Spanish interpreter for the Albany Law School’s Immigration Law Clinic, as well as a fellow at the Government Law Center. Prior to law school, Claudia worked at Little Flower Children and Family Services of New York where she advocated for immigrant children in the foster care field. She also worked at the Young Adults Institute where she cared for individuals with Down syndrome and Bipolar Disorder. Claudia graduated cum laude from Stony Brook University with a double major in Sociology and Psychology. She is a Peruvian native who has been residing in the U.S. for 6 years. Her own experience with her immigration paperwork has led her to have a strong interest in immigration law. Her other passions include health and family law.